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What’s a CSA????

Week one and look at all the yummy produce I brought home. We had to give some of it away because it was to much to cook.

What’s a CSA????? The best way to support local farmers and buy fresh and organic produce at a reasonable price.  I absolutely adore the concept of sustainable farming and I love shopping at Farmers markets so Community Supported Agriculture was the answer for me.  Now is the time to look into local CSA’s in your neighborhood and sign up today.  Be sure to research and compare cost!!!! Good luck!

Information below was taken from http://www.justfood.com

CSA Stands for Community Supported Agriculture

CSA allows city residents to have direct access to high quality, fresh produce grown locally by regional farmers.
When you become a member of a CSA, you’re purchasing a “share” of vegetables from a regional farmer. Weekly or bi-weekly, from June until October or November, your farmer will deliver that share of produce to a convenient drop-off location in your neighborhood.
CSA members pay for an entire season of produce upfront (typically $400-$600). This early bulk payment enables your farmer to plan for the season, purchase new seed, make equipment repairs, and more.
Shares usually include 7-10 types of vegetables, enough for a family of 2-3 people. Most CSAs also offer half shares for smaller households or busy New Yorkers who frequently eat out.
Many CSAs also offer the option of other produce from local farms. For a few extra dollars a week, in addition to your vegetables, you can add fruit, eggs, meat, and even flowers to your order.
Most CSAs have a variety of payment plans to enable members flexibility in paying for their shares. Some CSAs can arrange payments in installments, accept food stamps, offer sliding scale fees, and provide scholarship shares.
Neighborhood CSA groups are run by members. A rotating core group of volunteers take on much of the administrative management of the CSA. This can include signing up new members, collecting members payments, running the distribution site, and planning community-building or educational events. This frees up the farmers to focus on growing and delivering the vegetables.
Just Food trains urban community members to start and manage CSA projects in partnership with their farmers.
To see what a CSA in New York City might look like, see our Introduction to CSA video in our Resource Center.
A Note about Winter Shares
A CSA season typically runs from June through November. However, some farmers offer winter shares that come with a variety of root vegetables and greens. Contact your CSA directly to find out if your farmer offers winter shares.
Why Join A CSA?
Buy Local
Your support helps small local farms stay afloat.
Connect with the food you eat by meeting your farmers and exploring the farms.
Eat Well
Buy the freshest food for your family.
Explore new foods and learn to cook with them.
Find out that beet greens aren’t just good for you, they’re tasty too!
Be Healthy
Eat more fresh vegetables and fruit.
Share healthy eating habits with your kids. Expose them early to a variety of regional produce.
Protect the Environment
Support farmers who take care of their land by growing food in ways that take care of the soil.
Cut down on the number of miles your food travels from the farm to your plate.
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